Category: honeybee

Uninvited guest in the natural hive! I wonder …

Uninvited guest in the natural hive! I wonder what it’s doing in there?

Regular

Uh. So. I walked outside to get a pic or two of my super hive for a friend and looked up just in time to see what I assumed to be a queen bee flying out from one of my fenceline hives. It definitely wasn’t a worker because it was too big, and it was flying out and up instead of simply over the house like the others were.

Not sure what’s going on but if that’s a new queen’s mating flight I’m happy.

The newbees that came from the crawlspace are …

The newbees that came from the crawlspace are still here! Though it looks like they fell queenless shortly after they were put in there. I counted only four or five queen cells but hopefully the bee buddies are totally prepared. They also have plenty of eggs and young brood so they should be set for a while.
If you look closely in the larger queen cells pictured you can see the baby queens~

foxthebeekeeper: Crawl space bees! My latest …

foxthebeekeeper:

Crawl space bees!

My latest beemoval was a bit of a weird one. After failing to locate the bees in the floor or wall spaces directly around the entrance, I was showed to a crawl space so tight that none of my equipment could fit through. And as fate would have it, the bees were in the furthest corner from the entrance, behind some vent ducts and plumbing and across a whole lot of construction debris. I had to get creative!
So instead of trying to cut them out from the outside, I took a much harder but less destructive approach. I took a half-stuffed smoker and some bee go, and got right up by them. I sprayed a ring of bee-go around them on the inside then proceeded to pump as much smoke as I could right in to them. The rear combs cleared off instantly, and the rest of them were clear of bees in about 30 minutes. I just sat the smoker below them so that smoke would slowly rise up in to them as I cut out the combs. Since I couldn’t bring frames, boxes, or even buckets down there with me, I had to improvise a small tarp with a pillow case. I used the pillow case to set the comb on and drag as I army-crawled out backwards. Three trips later and I had all the comb out and framed up in a box I set just outside. I sprayed a lot of bee go in to the area they were in to make sure they left and stayed out. I then simply vacuumed them all up off the outside and was done! Now the new crawlspace beebees are in my bee yard orienting to their new home~

Well they’re still here a day and a half later, so I guess they’re staying for good! I’ll open them up soon to make sure they’re not cross-combing too badly then I’ll set some old frames in there so they can get back to work. Their queen was an excellent layer and I just hope she’s OK in there. If not they had plenty of eggs to make a new queen, but it will push them back about 3 weeks in development.

Crawl space bees! My latest beemoval was a bi…

Crawl space bees!

My latest beemoval was a bit of a weird one. After failing to locate the bees in the floor or wall spaces directly around the entrance, I was showed to a crawl space so tight that none of my equipment could fit through. And as fate would have it, the bees were in the furthest corner from the entrance, behind some vent ducts and plumbing and across a whole lot of construction debris. I had to get creative!
So instead of trying to cut them out from the outside, I took a much harder but less destructive approach. I took a half-stuffed smoker and some bee go, and got right up by them. I sprayed a ring of bee-go around them on the inside then proceeded to pump as much smoke as I could right in to them. The rear combs cleared off instantly, and the rest of them were clear of bees in about 30 minutes. I just sat the smoker below them so that smoke would slowly rise up in to them as I cut out the combs. Since I couldn’t bring frames, boxes, or even buckets down there with me, I had to improvise a small tarp with a pillow case. I used the pillow case to set the comb on and drag as I army-crawled out backwards. Three trips later and I had all the comb out and framed up in a box I set just outside. I sprayed a lot of bee go in to the area they were in to make sure they left and stayed out. I then simply vacuumed them all up off the outside and was done! Now the new crawlspace beebees are in my bee yard orienting to their new home~

I’m beginning to think I might need to f…

I’m beginning to think I might need to file a vent in the back of this big hive for ventilation.

How to tell the nectar flow is off: scrap hone…

How to tell the nectar flow is off: scrap honey in a processed box is gone in 30 minutes.

I just found this and wanted to share. These h…

I just found this and wanted to share. These hives look ridiculous in the face of traditional hives but they’re so cool I want 70 of them.

Regular

I dreamt I discovered a new social bee that looked a lot like a leafcutter but the queen was iridescent gold and they had brood/pollen/honey pots instead of honeycomb like bumblebees do. Their colonies were also super small like bumblebees.

Cool.

Florin was moved in to my super hive! There ar…

Florin was moved in to my super hive! There are so very many bees and so very much comb. I’m glad they’re doing well.
I got a good look at all the frames as I carefully slotted them all in one by one, so I know they’re still a very healthy and strong hive.
I moved all the inhabited frames in but the bees were still roaring so I knew the queen wasn’t with them. At first I thought that maybe they were just being fussy but after a minute or so of the roar I realized that the queen was not there. I walked over to the old hive location and apparently when I started moving the boxes, the queen jumped out of the hive and sat on the ground!! She was just sitting under the bench with several workers around her. I let her climb up on my hand and set her on the entrance to the new hive and she walked right in. Now I’m just waiting for the returning foragers to calm down in the nuc I set in the old location so that I can dump them in with the rest of the Florin gals~

Hopefully this will be a good move for them because they consistently had troubles with hive beetles. They are ankle-biters so they never had varroa, but I lost about 170lbs of honey to their hive beetles last year. Cedar is supposed to be good for keeping away pests so maybe it will help deal with things like that.