Author: The Golden Fox's Bees

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If support hasn’t decriminalized me by the end of the week I’m gonna have to go full hacker on this site.

(and follow that nifty tutorial that’s going around)

Do you know that your blog seems to be flagged…

Do you know that your blog seems to be flagged as explicit?

Too many bee behinds

Can you receive asks still?

Can you receive asks still?

Yuppers. Inbox filling up with people commenting on the explicit nature of my blog now.

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Lol my follower count is dropping so fast.

Hopefully that’s legitimate bots getting deleted, but given my case I know it isn’t.

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Ok how about now. Support said they undid the thing.

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Why is my header image gone

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Did I make it? Am I still live? Anyone read?

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swarmofbees-official:

I just learned about leafcutter bees! Are ther…

I just learned about leafcutter bees! Are there any other unique bee constructions, unlike the typical beehive most people think of?

Most bees don’t live in hives at all, typically only eusocial species of bees do and the vast majority of bee species are solitary. Though there is one Australia native eusocial species of bee that do live in hives and can actually be kept in specialised hive boxes: Tetragonula carbonaria or the sugarbag bee.

This is what their hive looks like in a hive box, as you can see they look nothing like a typical honeybee hive and you can’t actually have any frames in there. The middle spiral is the center of the hive where the brood is and where the queen sits right at the bottom, the pots around the spiral are the pollen and honey pots. You can see the pollen (yellow) on the right side, and the honey pots (top left).

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There is a species of solitary bee; Osmia avosetta that make their nests are flower petals. The female bee will collect the petals and then dig a small burrow which she the layers with the petals and mud. She’ll then fill the petal nest with pollen and nectar before laying her egg and folding the petals to seal the nest. It’s believed they use flower petals because it allows the inside of the nest to stay humid while the exterior hardens into a protective shell.  

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There are many solitary bee species that are ground-nesting species

making barrows in bare clay flats, sand, and dirt, such as this sweat bee (Agapostemon).

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Carpenter bees (Xylocopa) make similar nests in wood or rock faces hence their namesake. They bore into the wood and make rounded galleries inside the wood, as you can see in the photo below. They typically make these nests in the dead limbs or trucks on trees or even in structural wood  such as houses or fence posts.  

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